The Best Class You Never Taught

The Best Class You Never Taught
Author : Alexis Wiggins
Publisher : ASCD
Total Pages : 160
Release : 2017-09-27
ISBN 10 : 9781416624684
ISBN 13 : 1416624686
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

The Best Class You Never Taught Book Description:

The best classes have a life of their own, powered by student-led conversations that explore texts, ideas, and essential questions. In these classes, the teacher’s role shifts from star player to observer and coach as the students ▪ Think critically, ▪ Work collaboratively, ▪ Participate fully, ▪ Behave ethically, ▪ Ask and answer high-level questions, ▪ Support their ideas with evidence, and ▪ Evaluate and assess their own work. The Spider Web Discussion is a simple technique that puts this kind of class within every teacher’s reach. The name comes from the weblike diagram the observer makes to record interactions as students actively participate in the discussion, lead and support one another’s learning, and build community. It’s proven to work across all subject areas and with all ages, and you only need a little know-how, a rubric, and paper and pencil to get started. As students practice Spider Web Discussion, they become stronger communicators, more empathetic teammates, better problem solvers, and more independent learners—college and career ready skills that serve them well in the classroom and beyond. Educator Alexis Wiggins provides a step-by-step guide for the implementation of Spider Web Discussion, covering everything from introducing the technique to creating rubrics for discussion self-assessment to the nuts-and-bolts of charting the conversations and using the data collected for formative assessment. She also shares troubleshooting tips, ideas for assessment and group grading, and the experiences of real teachers and students who use the technique to develop and share content knowledge in a way that’s both revolutionary and truly inspiring.


RELATED BOOKS:
The Best Class You Never Taught
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Alexis Wiggins
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-27 - Publisher: ASCD

The best classes have a life of their own, powered by student-led conversations that explore texts, ideas, and essential questions. In these classes, the teacher’s role shifts from star player to observer and coach as the students ▪ Think critically, ▪ Work collaboratively, ▪ Participate fully, ▪ Behave ethically, ▪
The Best Class You Never Taught
Language: en
Pages: 160
Authors: Alexis Wiggins
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-27 - Publisher: ASCD

The best classes have a life of their own, powered by student-led conversations that explore texts, ideas, and essential questions. In these classes, the teacher’s role shifts from star player to observer and coach as the students ▪ Think critically, ▪ Work collaboratively, ▪ Participate fully, ▪ Behave ethically, ▪
The Greatest Lecture I Was Never Taught
Language: en
Pages: 154
Authors: Alexis Wiggins
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-07-19 - Publisher: BRILL

Inspired by non-fiction volumes of essays, this volume is a compilation not of scholarly text, but instructional vignettes of educators from all sectors sharing the greatest lesson they learned from their mentor that was never taught, but was rather observed.
Experience Inquiry
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Kimberly L. Mitchell
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-08-18 - Publisher: Corwin Press

One part practical guide, one part interactive journal, this book provides the opportunity to do inquiry as you read about it. You’ll learn what inquiry-based instruction looks like in practice through five key strategies, all of which can be immediately implemented in any learning environment. This resource offers Practical examples
What We Say and How We Say It Matter
Language: en
Pages: 168
Authors: Mike Anderson
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-02-26 - Publisher: ASCD

We all want our students to feel safe, collaborate well with others, feel ownership for their learning, and be joyfully engaged in their work. Nevertheless, many teachers end up using language patterns that undermine these goals. Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? We want students to take responsibility for